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UNIX History

Unix is a multitasking, multi-user computer operating system originally developed in 1969 by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs, including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, Brian Kernighan, Douglas McIlroy, Michael Lesk and Joe Ossanna. The Unix operating system was first developed in assembly language, but by 1973 had been almost entirely recoded in C, greatly facilitating its further development and porting to other hardware. Today's Unix system evolution is split into various branches, developed over time by AT&T as well as various commercial vendors, universities such as University of California, Berkeley's BSD and non-profit organizations.


During the late 1970s and early 1980s, the influence of Unix in academic circles led to large-scale adoption of Unix by commercial startups, the most notable of which are Solaris, HP-UX and AIX, as well as Darwin, which forms the core set of components upon which Apple's OS X, Apple TV, and iOS are based. Today, in addition to certified Unix systems such as those already mentioned, Unix-like operating systems such as MINIX, Linux, Android, and BSD descendants (FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, and DragonFly BSD) are commonly encountered. The term traditional Unix may be used to describe an operating system that has the characteristics of either Version 7 Unix or UNIX System V.

The companies developed their own Unix flavor and the details are :

IBM - AIX
SUN - Solaris ( now owned by Oracle company)
HP - HP-UX
RedHat - Redhat Linux (RHEL)

These are the most used unix flavors in the servers.
They use different architecture for the operating system to bulid in.


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